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Saturday
April 19, 2014



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A Guyana Photo Album

Click on the thumbnail images to see the full size photo (requires Javascript-capable browser). Unless stated otherwise, all images are less than 38 kB, and were taken by me during a visit in 1989.


Some sights in and around Georgetown

Stabroek Market
Stabroek Market

Stabroek Market, also familiarly known as "Big Market" is a central feature of the downtown core. It is named after a ward of the city. In this market, pretty much anything can be purchased, from clothes, to food stuffs, to jewellery. [No Javascript? Click here]

Bourda Market
Bourda Market

If Stabroek Market is Big Market, then the city's other market must be "Little Market", although I've never heard it called that. It is properly known as Bourda Market, named for another ward of the city. [No Javascript? Click here]

Bourda Market
Bourda Market [No Javascript? Click here]

Bourda Market
Bourda Market [No Javascript? Click here]

Bourda Market, like Stabroek Market, is a one-stop shopping centre where pretty much anything can be purchased there.

Main Street
Main Street

Every city has a "Main Street", and Georgetown is no exception. It is a tree-lined boulevard, along which retail businesses and hotels are located. It is central to the downtown core. This picture, and the others of the downtown core, were taken on a Sunday morning, hence the lack of traffic and people. [No Javascript? Click here]

Public Free Library
The Public Free Library

At one end of Main Street, by the Cenotaph, is the Library. Just off to the right in the distance is St. George's Cathedral -- the tallest wooden building in the world. The Bank of Guyana is at the right of the photograph. [No Javascript? Click here]

Brickdam Cathedral
Brickdam Cathedral

This imposing structure is Brickdam Cathedral, lead church of the country's Roman Catholic population. [No Javascript? Click here]

Parliament Building
Parliament Building

The Parliament Building houses Guyana's Legislative Assembly. [No Javascript? Click here]

City Hall
City Hall

Georgetown City Hall. In the foreground is one of the city's numerous drainage canals, familiarly called trenches. [No Javascript? Click here]

Sea wall
Sea wall

Since Guyana's coastline is just below sea level, there is the constant threat of the Atlantic Ocean swamping the place. The Dutch are credited for erecting the sea defence system (sea wall), extending for most of the coastline. It is a very pleasant place to go for a stroll, or to listen to a band play in the band stand (not shown). [No Javascript? Click here]

Le Meridien Pegasus
Le Meridien Pegasus

The Pegasus hotel has histrically been Georgetown's top hotel accommodation. Located right on the sea wall, it provides a nice view of the city and the Ocean, in addition to enjoying the cooling trade winds all year long. [No Javascript? Click here]

The Umana Yana
The Umana Yana

This large Amerindian hut (benab) is called the Umana Yana (Meeting Place), and is located right next to the Pegasus hotel. It is often used for exhibitions and other social and arts functions. [No Javascript? Click here]

Scene in the National Park
National Park

The National Park is located in the city proper and is a beautifullay landscaped park where people can go for a jog, or spend some time strollng around. It also has a large square with grandstands, where rallies and other meetings are often held. It is not an animal-based park. [No Javascript? Click here]

Koker
Koker

This koker, or sluice, is used to control the flow of water in the drainage canals (trenches) in the city. They are often seen all along the coastline especially close to the sea wall. The large wheel is used to raise and lower the gate, thereby blocking the flow of water. [No Javascript? Click here]

Demerara River
Demerara River

This is a view of the Demerara river looking inland, from the Demerara Harhour Bridge. At this point, the river is just about a mile wide, widening even further towards the final point of the estuary where it meets the Atlantic. Note the muddy water, characteristic of Guyana's coastline. [No Javascript? Click here]

Demerara Harbour Bridge
Demerara Harbour Bridge

The Demerara Harbour Bridge is one of the longest bridges of its kind in the world. It floats on pontoons, with a section in the middle which can be retracted to allow the passage of river traffic. The Demerara River is the country's busiest, although not the largest. That honour is reserved for the Essequibo River. [No Javascript? Click here]

Donkey Cart
Donkey cart

This is not at all an unfamiliar sight even in the city. A two-wheeled donkey cart is tethered to a lamp post. The donkey cart is a cheap and efficient way for cart men to earn their living hauling goods for a fee. A longer, four-wheeled variety of cart (dray cart) is usually pulled by a single horse. [No Javascript? Click here]


Flora and Fauna

Yellow Hibiscus
Yellow hibiscus

This beautiful specimen was shot early in the morning in the garden of my boyhood home, with the drops of dew still on the petals. [No Javascript? Click here]

Ginger Lily
Ginger lily flower

This photograph of a ginger lily flower was also taken somewhere in the garden, although at a different time of day. Ginger lilies are not known for their scent (they have none), but rather for their looks. They are also quite sturdy and last a fair while after they have been cut. [No Javascript? Click here]

Toucan
Toucan

The toucan is one of Guyana's many, many different species of bird. This one is a resdent of the Georgetown Zoo. [No Javascript? Click here]

Scarlet Ibis
Scarlet Ibis

Although the scarlet ibis is the national bird of neighgouring Trinidad and Tobago, it is one of the species with which Guyana is blessed. Taken at the Zoo. [No Javascript? Click here]

Macaws
Macaws

So now you know where macaws come from! These fine (and noisy) specimens were photographed in the Gerogetown Zoo. [No Javascript? Click here]


Viewers' photos ...

MV Barima
MV Barima

MV Barima is a ferry travelling between Parika and Bartika. Photo taken in 2002 and submitted by Joanne Fung-a-Fat via email. [No Javascript? Click here]

Have any great Guyana photos you would like to share? I can place them on this website with credit to you. Just email them to me.


More photos ...

These external sites have more photographs from Guyana.

http://www.geocities.com/TheTropics/Shores/9253/snaps.html
Snaps & Snips from Clyde Harris' Guyana Scrapbook
Photographs of Guyana
A collection of photographs on the Guyana News and Information website.
Matjaz Kuntner - Guyana Photo Gallery
Matjaz Kuntner - Guyana Photo Gallery
Linden Guy - Photo Gallery
Linden Guy - Photo Gallery
In Association with Amazon.com



Photos from Gary Verhelle


Old Photos from

David Hood


 


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Last Updated on : Saturday, May 29, 2010
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